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Loveland Social Security Disability Attorney
Loveland Social Security Disability Attorney
Click here to read helpful socialsecurity disability information. Case Evaluation
Social Security Disability Practice Areas
Filing an SSDI Claim
ALJ Hearings
Appeals Council
Applying for Disability Benefits
Back & Neck Pain / Spinal Injuries
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Denied Social Security Claims
Depression, Anxiety & Bipolar Disorder
Dire Need Cases
Disability Programs Types of Disability Benefits
Disability Terms and Definitions
Expediting Your Hearing
Federal Court Appeals
Fibromyalgia
Initial Determination
Joint Pain / Orthopedic Injuries
Multiple Sclerosis
Reconsideration
Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus & Lyme Disease
Social Security Disability Insurance Benefits
Social Security Disability Process & Timeline
SSD Benefits for Dependents
SSD When You Are 50 or Older
SSD Widows & Widowers Benefits
SSI Benefits for Children
Supplemental Security Income (SSI)
The Appeals Process
The Disability Evaluation Process
Phone
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Loveland Social Security Disability Lawyer

Dedicated Representation for Social Security Claimants

Social Security Disability laws and procedures were created to provide a regulated, enforced savings protection for hard working US citizens who become disabled and can no longer work. The Social Security Act established a number of programs with the following basic purposes:

  • To provide for the material needs of individuals and families;
  • To protect aged and disabled persons against the expenses of illnesses that may otherwise use up their savings;
  • To keep families together; and
  • To give children the chance to grow up healthy and secure.

These programs are funded through payroll taxes. In terms of the total amount of benefits paid, the U.S. Social Security program represents the greatest expenditure in the federal budget and the largest government in the world. It is estimated that the Social Security program prevents 40% of Americans age 65 and older from falling below the poverty line.

Although it is possible for you to file a claim for benefits on your own, a Loveland Social Security Disability attorney from Busch Law Offices will ensure that all documentation is competed correctly, that the appropriate medical records are included in your file, and that you are properly represented in the event your case is heard before an administrative law judge. Both Matt and Brett Busch are dedicated to protecting the rights of injured and disabled citizens in Colorado.

Social Security Disability Lawyer in Loveland

We have been helping clients in Loveland and Larimer County for over 30 years and we work personally with each client from the initial application through all levels of appeal. We understand the many regulations and requirements needed to successfully submit a request for disability insurance. We will persist on your behalf for the benefits you deserve. To better understand how we can help you submit a successful disability insurance claim, please review the following information and call our offices for a free initial case evaluation:

ALJ Hearings An administrative law judge (ALJ) in the United States is an official who presides at an administrative trial-type hearing to obtain and hear evidence on an application to a government agency for Social Security benefits. Click here to read more about ALJ hearings.

Appeals Council You will receive a letter of explanation whenever Social Security makes a decision regarding your eligibility for Social Security or Supplemental Security Income benefits. If you disagree with the decision, you have the right to appeal or as us to review your case. Click here to learn more about appeals council.

Apply for Disability Benefits To receive Social Security benefits, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments or Medicare, you must sign an application. You can apply for retirement benefits, disability benefits, Medicare and spouse's benefits. Click here to find out more about apply for disability benefits.

Back and Neck Pain / Spinal Injuries The SSA defines "disability" as the inability to engage in any substantial gainful activity by reason of any medical determinable physical or mental impairment which can be expected to result in death or which has lasted or can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than 12 months. Applying this definition, you may be eligible for disability. Read more about back and neck pain/spinal injuries.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Often both chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia are not considered medically determinable impairments. The SSA defines "disability" as the inability to engage in any substantial gainful activity by reason of any medical determinable physical or mental impairment which can be expected to result in death or which has lasted or can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than 12 months. Click here to read more about fibromyalgia. Read more about chronic fatigue syndrome.

Denied Social Security Claims There are two main reasons for a denial of a claim for Social Security disability benefits. A treating doctor's notes do not show sufficient physical or mental limitation to support your inability to work or his or her notes do not contain sufficient detail to prove an inability to work at any job. Click here to find out more about denied Social Security claims.

Depression, Anxiety and Bipolar Disorder We help people who can't work because of physical or mental impairments to obtain Social Security Disability (SSD) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits each year. We fight to protect our clients' interests in administrative hearings and appeals. Read more about depression, anxiety and bipolar disorder.

Dire Need Cases An Administrative Law Judge Hearing may be requested or a hearing office may request an ALJ Hearing to request information on short notice for a possible on-the-record (OTR) decision or a dire need review. Learn more about dire need cases.

Disability Programs Types of Disability Benefits There are two main types of disability programs - The Social Security Disability Insurance Program (SSDI) and the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Program. They are financed differently and are based on different criteria. Click here for more about disability programs and types of disability benefits.

Disability Terms and Definitions There are myriad terms, abbreviations and definitions within the Social Security Administration (SSA) framework. For instance, there is the vital definition of "disabled." SSA defines a "child" and associated benefits under what circumstances. Learn more about disability terms and definitions.

Expediting Your Hearing Depending on the situation, some cases can be expedited. Actions you take prior to your ALJ Hearing can dramatically reduce the time to receive benefits. Retaining a competent Social Security Disability attorney who understands the law and will fully prepare all the documentation needed beforehand, will assist you to expedite your claim. Read more about expediting your hearing.

Federal Court Appeals There are several levels in the appeals process. Level I Reconsideration is a complete review. Level II Hearing, is presentation of your case in person. Level III Appeals Council, is a review in which the council can make a new decision. Level IV Federal Court Review is the last level of appeal where you have the right to file a civil suit in Federal District Court. Learn more about Federal Court appeals.

Fibromyalgia A diagnosis of fibromyalgia may not considered a medically determinable impairment. The SSA defines "disability" as the inability to engage in any substantial gainful activity by reason of any medical determinable physical or mental impairment which could lead to death or the inability to function at work for 12 months or longer . Click here to read more about fibromyalgia...

Initial Determination The Disability Determination Services office is a State agency responsible for developing medical evidence and making the initial determination on whether or not a claimant is disabled under the law. DDS usually tries to obtain evidence from the claimant's own medical sources first. Learn more about initial determination.

Joint Pain / Orthopedic Injuries The SSA defines "disability" as the inability to engage in any substantial gainful activity by reason of any medical determinable physical or mental impairment that will inhibit your ability to work for 12 months or more. If you suffer from serious joint pain or injuries, you may be eligible for disability. Learn more about joint pain / orthopedic injuries.

Multiple Sclerosis The SSA definition of "disability" applies to multiple sclerosis when periodic episodes of the disease are frequent, especially when the disease is expected to last for a continuous period of 12 months or more. Click here to find out more about multiple sclerosis.

Reconsideration If your initial application for Social Security Disability (SSD) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) has been denied, there are legal actions that could be taken to appeal the decision. You may still be able to obtain benefits. There is a review and appeal process, and SSA will still extend benefits to claimants whose initial claims were denied in many cases. Read more about reconsideration.

Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus and Lyme Disease Rheumatoid arthritis is a disabling disease and sufferers are often eligible for benefits. The immune system disorder, lupus, is a disability. Under certain conditions, Lyme disease is considered a disability. Click here for more about rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and Lyme disease.

Social Security Disability Insurance Benefits Social Security Disability Insurance provides income to individuals no longer able to work because of a physically or psychologically restrictive disability. SSDI is funded by payroll taxes and does not depend on the recipient's income level, as it is based solely on work history and degree of disability. Read more about Social Security Disability Insurance benefits.

Social Security Disability Process and Timeline The first step in the Social Security application process is determining whether your are eligible to apply for SSDI or SSI benefits based on the qualification criteria and definition of disability provided by the Social Security Administration. Read more about Social Security Disability process and timeline.

SSD Benefits for Dependents When you are eligible for retirement or disability benefits, dependents may receive benefits on your record: unmarried children under 18 years, or 19 years and a full-time student; disabled children 18 years or older, but disabled before age 22. Your spouse or ex-spouses age 62 or older. Learn more about SSD benefits for dependents.

SSD When You Are 50 or Older If you are age 50 or older and have become disabled to the point where you can no longer work a full-time job, your eligibility for Social security disability benefits may be easier to demonstrate than if you were younger than 50. Read more about SSD when you are 50 or older.

SSD Widows and Widowers Benefits A widow or a widower may receive SSD benefits at 60 or at 50 if disabled under certain criteria: You and the worker were validly married or you would have the status of husband or wife for that person's personal property if he or she had no will; or you went through a marriage ceremony in good faith that would have been valid except for legal impediment. Learn more about SSD widows and widowers benefits.

SSI Benefits for Children The criteria for Supplemental Security Income or SSI benefits for children, is in the definition of a "child" according to the SSA. The SSA defines a child as a person who is neither married nor head of a household and is under age 18; or is under age 22 and is a student regularly attending school. To be eligible for benefits a child must be either blind or disabled. Read more about SSI benefits for children.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) SSI offers monetary assistance to low-income individuals who are at least age 65, blind and/or disabled. SSI pays cash benefits to supplement the cost of food, clothing and shelter. Unlike SSDI, the SSI program is funded by general tax revenues, not Social Security taxes. Click here for more about Supplemental Security Income.

The Appeals Process The several levels in the appeals process are: Level I Reconsideration is a complete review. Level II Hearing, is presentation of your case in person. Level III Appeals Council, is a review in which the council can make a new decision. Level IV Federal Court Review is the last level of appeal where you have the right to file a civil suit in Federal District Court. Read more about the appeals process.

The Disability Evaluation Process The first step in the Social Security application process is determining whether you are eligible to apply for SSDI or SSI benefits based on the qualification criteria and strict definition of disability. With the assistance of a Loveland Social Security Disability Attorney to represent your interests, the evaluation process will go smoothly forward to the outcome you deserve. Read more about the disability evaluation process.

The application process for either SSDI or SSI benefits can be long and complex. The large majority of initial applications for disability benefits are denied. In the interests of speeding up the process, you may want to consider retaining an experienced Loveland Social Security Disability attorney from our firm. We do not charge a fee unless we successfully resolve your claim and we will ensure the process moves as swiftly and smoothly as possible.

Contact a Loveland Social Security Disability attorney from our offices today!